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Zuiun Kitchen Knife

$390.00

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"Zuiun" means "the cloud that appears as a sign of good fortune" in Buddhism. So it’s a great gift for celebrations such as a marriage or the perfect gift for the foodie in your life.  The Zuiun features 2 varieties:

  1. "Gyuto" is a butcher knife which is commonly used in kitchen alongside “Santoku (all-purpose)” knives. The tip of this knife is a little sharper than the Santoku knife, and the blade is longer. It is especially useful for cutting big ingredients because it has a long blade.
  2. "Sujibiki" is a kitchen knife for slicing meat. The blade is long, wide and thin, similar to the sashimi knife. The difference comparing to the sashimi knife is that the slicing knife has double edged sword. You can also use this for cutting sashimi.

Features of Zuiun Knife:

  • Zuiun butcher knife has traditional stylish design that resembles Japanese katana. The hybrid of a thin blade knife and a sashimi knife, this butcher knife is double-edged. Because it is not single edged, it can be used for a wide variety of food – meat, vegetables, sashimi. Also, because the tip of the knife is pointy, it can also be used for food decoration. 
  • Katana with a beautiful pattern is famous in Japan and abroad. The knife is made from the highest quality sword steel – Damascus steel with the SPG2 (Super Gold 2). Beautiful floating clouds pattern is created by layering Damascus steel on both sides and by skillful sharpening of the knife by an artisan.
  • The core material, SPG 2 (Super Gold 2) is exceptional for creating a katana with 4 characteristics [Sharpness, Toughness, Durability, Corrosion Resistance]. Made from the superb steel for katana and in the traditional Japanese katana shape “Hamaguriha (Convex edge)” which guarantees excellent sharpness and durability. Also, it is easy to resharpen.
  • Handle material is made from packer wood, heptagon shape is easy to hold and it has a Japanese atmosphere. It has a sophisticated design with decoration that can be seen while holding the knife.

Seki-Kanetsugu Cutlery:

As Seki-Kanetsugu Cutlery CO.,LTD. celebrated the company's 100th anniversary on December 2018, they have been developing new steak knives and kitchen knives as part of their 100th anniversary model.

"Zuiun" is a traditional Japanese style kitchen knife with a sharpness reminiscent of a Japanese sword. As the company was founded by the descendants of swordsmith, they have been developing products which has special characteristics of the Japanese katana (doesn’t fold, doesn’t bend, cuts well).

"Zuiun" means "the cloud that appears as a sign of good fortune" in Buddhism. So it’s a great gift for celebrations such as marriage.

Company History:

Seki-Kanetsugu Cutlery CO., LTD. was founded in 1918 by Matsujiro Kawamura, the descendant of the swordsmith “Kanetsugu”, and celebrated 100th year anniversary in December 2018.

The first Kanetsugu began making swords in Mino during the Jowa period (1345-1349) and continued since then. Inheriting the tradition of swordsmith, the company achieved special characteristics of the Japanese katana - [doesn’t fold, doesn’t bend, cuts well], that are indispensable for the knife, by combining traditional artisan craft and innovative modern technology.

They are currently developing useful, sharp and long-lasting knives to accommodate the changing lifestyle. Today, they produce knives for house and leisure use which regularly used not only in Japan, but also abroad.

TOLQ

TOLQ is a Tokyo-based fashion apparel concept developer focused on breathing new life into vintage and heritage styles and movements.

The trompe l’oeil painting technique of the 18th and 19th century Europe is used in modern print applications to create 3D illusions and vintage-like apparel.

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In a world where illusion often trumps truth, TOLQ finds value in the past, and recreates it in fun, high-energy, trend-forward fashions.

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